The problem with purple headed yogurt slingers…

NaughtyWords200x300I was putting the finishing touches to Naughty Words for Nice Writers, A Sexual and Spanking Thesaurus, when my husband, who had gone to breakfast with the guys called me. (They’d obviously been talking about the book).

Husband:  Do you have a purple headed yogurt slinger?
Me: What?
Husband: Do you have a purple headed yogurt slinger?
Me: No. What is that?
Husband: It’s a word for pecker.

Funny? Yes. Romantic or erotic? No.

The conversation illustrates the challenge created by the limitations of the English language: much of our vocabulary to describe sex doesn’t set the right mood or tone for romance or erotica. When I wrote my first erotic romance back in 2009, I immediately noted how few positive, romantic synonyms there were to describe sexual intercourse. English words are either cold and clinical, crude, or ribald. A standard thesaurus offers a woeful lack of synonyms and the internet only those of the purple yogurt slinger variety.

So word by word, I created my own thesaurus by filling a spiral notebook with verbs and nouns I could use. I wracked my brain for words to describe desire, orgasm, male and female sexual organs, etc. Since 2009, I’ve read close to 500 erotic romances. Whenever I came across a fresh usage of a word, I made a note. And I searched the internet too, culling down the lists to only those words that could be used in romance.

I ended up with more than 1,200 synonyms in 25 different categories.

Naughty Words for Nice Writers is available on in paperback and ebook on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. In addition, it’s available in PDF through All Romance eBooks, so authors can keep a copy on their laptop or tablet for when they write away from home.

Paperback on Amazon |  Kindle |  Paperback on Barnes & Noble| Nook

PDF on All Romance

Naughty Words for Nice Writers back cover copy

If you’ve struggled to find the right tone for your romantic sex scene, stared at the computer for 15 minutes trying to come up with the perfect verb, become stymied because some terms are too crude while others are too flowery, or found yourself reusing the same words over and over, Naughty Words for Nice Writers, A Sexual and Spanking Thesaurus can help you break through those barriers. Cara Bristol, the author of 17 erotic romances, has written a guide to help you find the erotic words to write a sex scene that sizzles.

Naughty Words for Nice Writers is packed with more than 1,200 usable, functional synonyms geared for romance, erotic romance, and erotica. Included are 28 different “erotic word lists” such as male and female anatomy, foreplay, orgasm, specific sexual acts and kink, sexual noises, spanking terminology, and much more. The guide offers suggestions on how to write a sex scene and how to tighten your writing so it sings.

With an emphasis on verbs, this guide will help you “show” the intimacy between your characters rather than tell it. Whether you’re writing a “fade to black” scene or a graphic and explicit one, Naughty Words for Nice Writers will give you the words.

 

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11 Responses to The problem with purple headed yogurt slingers…

  1. Roz Harrison says:

    ROFLMAO at the purple headed yogurt slinger. Definitely not ronsntic! LoL.

    The thesaurus is such a great idea!

    Hugs
    Roz

  2. Roz Harrison says:

    ROFLMAO at the purple headed yogurt slinger. Definitely not ronsntic! LoL.

    The thesaurus is such a great idea!

    Hugs
    Roz

    • Cara Bristol says:

      Thanks, Roz. I think it fills a need. As I think of new words, I’m making a list and at some point in the future, I’ll probably expand it.

  3. Isn’t it nice when our husbands try to be helpful? 🙂

  4. Just bought your thesaurus in paperback – so glad the purple headed yogurt slinger isn’t included!

    • Cara Bristol says:

      Thank you. 🙂 My goal was to make the thesaurus functional, and offer a variety of words for all subgenres of romance–so there are terms for historical writers, contemporary, sci-fi, etc.

  5. S.J. Maylee says:

    Ha! Too much. 🙂 Thanks for the giggle this morning, Cara. Your thesaurus has helped me several times already. Thank you for all that research and note taking.

  6. Lunabelle says:

    I think I need this book! It’s hard to keep the mood and also use varied vocabulary.

    Also, I just did a post about the use of awful euphemisms in erotica…and tried to write the worst story ever. http://ninjasexology.com/2015/02/28/erotica-challenge-the-euph-off/

    • Cara Bristol says:

      I read your post. Your parody provided a good example of how not to use euphemisms. Thanks for sharing.

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