#Spanking & kink among innocence and wholesomeness?

shoesWhen I set out to write an erotic spanking romance set on a college campus in the 1950s, I wanted it to be historically accurate. I didn’t want to slap a poodle skirt and a pair of saddle shoes on my heroine and then put her in an otherwise modern scenario. I wanted the story to be true to the values and culture of the time.

But how do you write a kinky sex story set in a decade that epitomized wholesomeness? Viewed through the lens of nostalgia and popular TV shows like “Happy Days,” “Father Knows Best,” and “Ozzie and Harriet,” the decade of the 1950s seems as clean-cut as a starched white shirt. “I Love Lucy” would have you believe married couples slept in separate beds.

sodaIt is true that the emphasis was on family, conformity, and wholesomeness. Girls were not supposed to have sex before marriage and a girl who did quickly earned herself a bad reputation as a “loose” or “fast” woman.  This was the time before birth control pills (the first oral contraceptive wasn’t approved in the US until 1960), and a young woman who got pregnant either married immediately or went to a home for unwed mothers and then gave her baby up for adoption. To be unwed and pregnant was shameful. Divorce was also looked upon with suspicion.

Couples in the US married at a younger age than at any other time in US history. In 1950 and 1960, the average notesage of first marriage was 20.3 years for women and 22.8 years for men, compared to 2010 when it was 26.1 for women and 28.2 for men, or 1890 when it was 22.0 for women and 26.1 for men. Most women married right out of high school, and marrying well was considered a woman’s greatest aspiration.

But sex, it was a happenin’. What people professed to do, and what they actually did behind closed doors were two vastly different things.

The term “sex symbol” came into usage in the 1950s, the decade that produced sexual icons dear abbyMarilyn Monroe, Jayne Mansfield, Brigitte Bardot, Raquel Welch, and Elvis “the Pelvis” Presley.

Founded by Hugh Hefner, Playboy magazine debuted in 1953 with Marilyn Monroe as its first nude centerfold.

Biologist and sexologist Alfred Kinsey got people “all shook up” with his reports Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) and Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953), which discussed taboo subjects like homosexuality and BDSM. According to Kinsey’s reports, heterosexuality was not as “exclusive” as people believed it was.

While Kinsey relied on surveys and self-ricky spanking lucyreports for his data, William Masters and Virginia Johnson observed people having sex in their studies, which began in 1957. In the laboratory, they watched couples having sexual intercourse and masturbating, their research debunking some commonly accepted “facts” about female sexuality and revolutionizing sex therapy.

Against this backdrop, I wrote my story, Educating His Bride, about a young woman’s blossoming sexuality and introduction to kink while under the tutelage of her much more experienced husband. It’s hot, erotic, kinky—and as historically accurate as I could make it.

Educating His Bride

From college coed to professor’s naughty bride…EducatingHisBride_600x900

It’s the 1950s. Never much interested in her studies, Margaret Atwater attends college hoping to graduate with an Mrs. degree instead of a bachelor’s. When she catches the eye of English Professor Henry Thurston, she’s thrilled to marry him, drop out of school, and begin a new life as a married woman and faculty wife. However, Henry is a kinky man who has much to teach his eager young bride—in, and out, of the bedroom. As Mrs. Henry Thurston, Margaret’s sexual education has just begun.

Educating His Bride was originally published in the anthology, Correcting the Coeds. It has been re-released as a single title.

Educating His Bride is now on Kindle Unlimited!

Amazon US | Amazon UK | Amazon AU | Amazon CA

 

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6 Responses to #Spanking & kink among innocence and wholesomeness?

  1. Great post and great book. 🙂

  2. Loved the Dear Abby article. Great post. Yes, times they were a-different in the 50s and 60s. According to TV censors back in the 50s, married couples bedrooms had to have twin beds and if two characters were on the same bed, one of them always had to keep one foot on the floor.

    I do think people were more innocent back then and “waiting” until marriage was what good girls did, and if a husband should “stray” the “good wife” was supposed to look the other way.

    • Cara Bristol says:

      Yes, if a man strayed, it was often considered the wife’s fault. Women’s magazines used to run articles about how to be good wife (keep yourself nice, listen to him, don’t talk about yourself or your problems, keep a clean house, etc.) so he didn’t stray.

  3. Great post, Cara. It reminded me of how damn lucky I am to have been born in 1959, and came of age in the 1970s. 🙂

    • Cara Bristol says:

      I know, right? It’s a totally different world for women. I can’t imagine what it must have been like to have so few choices.

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